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Posts Tagged ‘women’s sports’

Check out this video of Donna Lopiano, CEO of the Women’s Sports Foundation. In this clip, she explains why media networks do not support women’s sports as much as men’s.
“It has no relation to public interest,” Dr. Lopiano says, “and our only hope lies in the digital universe.”
THANK YOU DONNA!
Like I said before, the only hope for coverage of women’s sports is in the digital universe, and I believe the answer lies right here in the blogosphere. We just need to build our community.
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I read on the Pretty Tough blog [one of my new favorites in the blogosphere] that the US women’s soccer team played Brazil the other night for a friendly game. Only it didn’t turn out to be a regular night. Amy Wambach rushed to try to reach a ball defended by Brazilian player Maria Rosa late in the game, collided with her and suffered a midshaft oblique fracture on both her tibia and fibula [aka, she broke her leg and can’t play in the Olympics].

As you can read in one of my earlier posts, Wambach is the strength of the USA team’s offense. This is a severe blow to a team who is picked to bring home the gold.

This really sucks for Wambach, too, who was at the high point of her career.

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For nearly two hours on Saturday, the Williams family rocked the tennis world’s grandest stage as they battled at Wimbledon. Unfortunately for Serena, Venus has the best standing record at the All England Club; her 7-5, 6-4 victory gave her a fifth singles title, leaving Serena with just two.

According to the New York Times, Serena explained to reporters that “there’s nothing to be satisfied about.”

However, it seemed she cheered up later in the night as she and her sister joined forces to win their third women’s doubles title, beating Lisa Raymond of the United States and Samantha Stosur of Australia, 6-2, 6-2.

But for many, the singles match was the highlight of the day. Two sisters with similar background and genetic makeup, battling for one of the most prestigious titles in the sport.

Many tennis enthusiasts say the one thing Venus has that makes her so incredibly hard to beat is her height: she’s 6 feet 1 inches tall (compared to her sister, who stands at 5 feet 10 inches tall), allowing her to cover a lot of ground at the net.

Also, her serves are incredibly fast. In the first game of the second set, Venus hit the fastest serve ever recorded by a woman at Wimbledon, 129 miles per hour.

I think this proves one thing and one thing only: Venus was giving it everything she had, and she came out on top, making history. I think it’s safe to say that Saturday’s match served as another thrilling moment in women’s sports.

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Once an athlete, always an athlete. You never lose it. Your entire life, you have certain values ingrained in you that make you who you are. Teamwork, goal-setting, discipline, competitiveness, leadership, fair play… we all know how it works.

So when a friend of mine sent me a link for a feature by Curve magazine which profiles women over the age of 30 who are becoming amateur athletes, I wasn’t at all surprised.

The piece is entitled “All American Girls,” and profiles women over the age of 30 who are becoming amateur athletes in sports they’re trying for the first time. From surfing and power lifting to flag football and rugby, the stories of these women should inspire all of us to leave our fears and doubts about injuries and time commitments behind and take to the fields of games we’ve been itching to try since we were young. They might not be professionals, but as far as athletic competition is concerned, it’s just the beginning.

One of these profiles really caught my eye, and it’s about Mona Rayside who plays in a rugby club in Washington, DC.

Mona Rayside is 30 years old and has been playing rugby since 1991. Although rugby has been famously dubbed “the barbarian’s sport played by gentlemen,” it started attracting ladies in the mid-1970s and now rivals softball for popularity. Rayside plays for the Maryland Stingers, one of the top women’s club teams in the nation.

Rayside likes the sport because it resembles “female power.” She says, “When I started playing, it was a revelation, because all of a sudden people were excited to see a big ol’ girl come on the field,” she recalls, a smile in her voice. “Rugby … helped me recognize and find my own strength, and to realize that I was physically strong and that that was something to be desired.”

As a basketball player, one of the aspects about Rugby that I am particularly jealous of is the sense of community among its players, or, “ruggers.” First, they’re tough people in general. To go out there and take a hit with no padding on has GOT to hurt. But they encourage each other to get right back up and keep playing.

Second, after the match, they DRINK (party + eat) with their opponents! Often dubbed a “drink up,” this great tradition ingrains sportsmanship and respect for the sport in each of the athletes.

Third, I love the sense of community. I am jealous of the clubs set up for those of us out of college in cities around the world. These serve as “families” of sort (much like my college basketball team was for me). It’s a great way to meet people and have fun. I miss that sense of community, and having moved to a new city, I wish I had it here. Unfortunately, when it comes to basketball, it seems that level of organization seems to dissipate after college.

Although I’d love to try it, I don’t have the time to commit to learning rugby right now. And I don’t think or want to think that I’d enjoy taking a hit that hard.

Plus, my “love” is with basketball. My community is found among basketball players, or “ballers.” I’ve been playing the sport competitively since I was about six years old.

With the overwhelming national popularity of women’s basketball, I really wish there would be more formalized “clubs” that we could join and participate in as adults . I’m not talking about just rec leagues. I’m talking about clubs, membership-oriented communities of adults who fund raise, practice on a regular basis and travel to play in tournaments on the weekends in various cities.

Ballers, where are we? It’s time to get organized. Maybe we can learn a few things from our “rugger” friends.

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